Reclaim: Rebloom: Growing With OLLI  (Osher Lifelong Learning Institute)
OLLI members worked collaboratively led by Sandra Krupp to produce this mural
constructed completely of recycled magazines which celebrates creative
 potential at any age.  The mural was installed in the OLLI office, University of
Rhode Island, Kingston.


 
 
The Commonplace Project, North Kingstown, RI Free Library
 

jpg. commonplace

The Commonplace Project at the North Kingstown Free Library was created by artist Sandra Krupp to

 

- Celebrate reading and literature communally at the local public library

- Draw attention to the library as a unique common place in the community
- Introduce the practice of keeping commonplace books

 

The project included

- An illustrated talk by the artist/project director

- A commonplace breakfast where library patrons read literary quotations aloud to the group

-An exhibit of collages made by volunteers which incorporated quotations submitted by library patrons
 

The Commonplace Project was funded by the Friends of the North Kingstown Library and the North Kingstown Arts Council.

 

Other community projects include directing  "Draw and Doodle, Do!" and the "Big Draw North Kingstown", community wide hands on drawing for all ages and abilities, affiliated with the BIG DRAW in the United Kingdom  http://www.nkartscouncil.org/BigDraw.html


Shelf Life: A Celebration of Poetry and Art at the North Kingstown Free Library was an exhibit of visual art by a dozen artists who made work inspired by poetry. The art work was displayed on library shelves with a copy of the poem that inspired it. An opening celebration that included reading poetry aloud was held for the artists and the public.

 

For Remnants of Hamilton Mill,  library patrons chose remnants from a defunct,
local mill to inspire art works which were exhibited at the library. A local historian presented a slide talk about the mill's history which inspired the art pieces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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